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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
is anna from the dallas-fort worth world affairs council. i teach seniors, so i have been facebooking for the conference and the ask questions and i answer back and i've already scanned my notes. the point is they want to know for this -- right now because they are on line with the -- should they be optimistic? they're very scared, the class of 2013. what can i pass on to them about economic competitiveness and they should be optimistic or worried? >> great question from the seniors. okay, steve. slingbox >> notwithstanding everything i said before -- [laughter] i'm actually optimistic. i'm optimistic because heidi ticked off a number of these before in a slightly different context. we have the most flexible economy in the world. we have this incredibly diverse labor force and a diverse group of people in this country that come here because the opportunity. there aren't that many people that leave america to go all these other places that we worry about being more competitive than we are the there's a long line of people that still want to come here. immigration is a big issue in this
heritage. these elders speak with profound intellectual depth. when i spoke to dallas reared in one of a translator she says she deeply felt this book was the voice of the older and was just translating the book. she wanted me to read this acceptance speech evers the humble and unassuming elders speak with kindness generosity profound intellectual depth and speak of the consciousness of land and sea. this team initiative by the elders themselves over the past seven years produced a series of books on a growing in importance as we look to our bears and realizes how to better live on this land. to talk to guilders where they build camps and fished and listen to the older people tell stories. it is a model for the rest of america with the foundational beginning of our rio education. -- real education. alice and and sent to the acceptance speech. they're not here today. >> we're both grateful for the honor to name our but for the mayor 10 book award. this it is an extraordinary event. never before has the use of men and women of southwest alaska of been recognized nationally for the elo
francisco's the birds that are all very democratic. denver las vegas and phoenix and the dallas houston san antonio atlanta charlotte and north carolina were very republican so i think calling suburbs analyzing pricing suburbs doesn't work. you have to look at each individual suburb word each region of the country and finally, number six, we have to rethink the way we spend money on politics. this was a 6 billion-dollar election-year with status quo results. i think the biggest success when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about the message but the macro-- karl rove separated billionaires from billions of their dollars to what effect? i mean it may be more effective way to pay voters directly. there is probably more return for your investment and i would conclude by saying that probably the supreme court of the united states, the second most important institution in the united states in aiding the economic recovery, because next to the fed they have done more to pump more money, more stimulus into the economy in states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and
until billets raining on kennedy and dallas during the east st. louis of his life. what did he know? how did we get here quiet what kept us moving? who kept us moving? miles davis is one of the people who kept me moving. he and i went to the same high school as did one of the pioneers up on the hill. but for moral service, we couldn't get a spot on the sidewalk, not to mention trying to get a seat in lincoln high school, where he graduated in 1944 and was one of two teenagers of the black community at juilliard. that may be her record. i read a long poem of which all recite. trust up and came began a scenario climb up the tribal stairwell. greeks, radiant at the at the at the, spread like laughter or ethiopia's wings. more in its own percussive rise became the st. louis area. bore witness to the calm, the careless silence, the casket to tears, that death of the crew became the burden of an ancestor. hear y'all, the death of the two became the birth of an ancestor. and many of the newspapers that covered that memorial had headlines in kansas city, st. louis come the death of the crew do m
nile virus was around dallas because of budget cuts. remember, this is a disease spread by mosquitoes. texas has no entomologist anymore. they cut the position because they ran out of money. >> we've got time for one -- we'll finish on time at 8:30. we've got time for one or maybe two. >> [inaudible] >> okay. depending on conciseness, maybe a couple more. >> so for over a century, the u.s. forest service had the policy of extinguishing any fire that was detected on federal land, and as the ability to detect fire from the air and from satellites has improved over the decades, unfortunately, that kind of wound up with a situation where we have these huge, hot, devastating forest fires in the modern era. is our public health policy doing something similar? >> i don't know who's going to answer that one. [laughter] it's an interesting metaphor, but i don't know if it's necessarily completely transferable to this situation. >> let me vary that a little bit then and ask, um, what about the trend of decline in vaccination? another of our colleagues, seth luiken, wrote a book called "the pani
the first five minutes of an episode of" dallas" from 19788 which was hottest show from reality tv. who shot j.r. show, listeners or viewers will remember. it is amazing. ever can catch it on tv fascinating to watch because it is so, the relationship between the producers and the writers and the audience is so condescending. there is this very palpable sense that the creators of the show just think that the audience can't possibly understand who these characters are and they spend two minutes kind of going, these two people are brothers. did everybody get that? whereas show today, not just that edited more quickly, that they're able to kind of go much faster and challenge the audience. look at a show like, "lost" which was insanely complicated. that show would have never gotten anywhere near national television in 1977 or '78. so there is tolerance for complexity and, and being challenged that the audience has now that we didn't have when i was growing up. >> host: steven johnson is our guest on "in depth". bill in oklahoma, you are first up today. please go ahead with your question or comme
couples to be allowed to marry for each stray couple of his divorced. congratulations dallas vegas, you're about to be the case city in america. and to finally bring transparency back to political process, like drugs and cigarettes, hd piece of legislation must clearly state the possible side effects and must be titled, to reflect its actual content. thus the picture that will be renamed fescue thomas jefferson. we don't stop there. our manifesto will enlighten the american people with chapters entitled the elitist scourge, how to a people who are better than you. the metric system, exactly ten times more often than imperial units. we peeled off the layers of america. american exceptional wasn't about to make other countries feel bad about the bodies. we present practical solutions and how to relieve america's sexual tension. crime and punishment, and then come again. we even created simple multiple choice questionnaires for healthy american children determine the value as future americans. and to reinvigorate the youth vote, many of which are right here, we have invented a drinking gam
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)